You are Visitor No . online counter

Leader Chetan Upadyaya experssing his journey of Prayana


Someone rightly said that energy channelized in proper way gives a greater impact. I did the same after attending Lead Prayana 2014, which made me realize my potential to channelize my own energy in the right way. I, Chetan Upadyaya, belong to a traditional Bramhan family from a very remote place called Hiriadaka which is 15kms away from the pilgrimage place of Lord Krishna- Udupi. 



Being the son of a purohit Madivalappa Upadyaya. I always used to go with him for ‘poojas’ ‘homas’ and ‘havanas’ in my free time. I have always been passionate to join and learn Medicine but due to our financial condition, I ended up joining SDM college of Ayurveda . I’m very talkative and studious too. I even actively participate in cultural events in college as I practice Yakshagana and Carnatik music. My HOD must have noticed my active participation or maybe it was sheer luck, he called me and told me that, the only candidate selected for LEAD Prayana 2014 from our college is me. Without knowing much, travelled to Hubli.

As days passed, Prayana become more appealing, exiting and inspiring.
Every day meetings, inspiring role models and the highly enthusiastic participants of Prayana and their life journey was like a real time experience of leaders and their work.  On board with my co-prayanees, the travelling, talking and discussions enlightened me especially when they shared their experience and their projects. I was fascinated with the idea of projects and wanted to make a mark of my own through projects.  I heard the story of a budding leader, a village girl who worked part time to help her family and for her education. She had also constructed 3 water tanks and made provision for street lights for her village worth Rs 2.35 lakhs which solved the water problem in her village. Leader Anuradha’s story inspired me and decided to do something for the people.   

I returned to Udupi from Prayana with utmost joy and inspiration. I thought of doing some project but time was a problem due to busy schedules in our college. But finally, I took my first step by explaining to my friends Sangitha, Nagashri, Sukruth and Vibha about LEAD and they supported me wholeheartedly. Together we started teaching music in a home for the mentally challenged children. Initially, we faced many difficulties. But now, we are successfully teaching them music on a regular basis and also started teaching music in an orphanage to 50 children. Our motto is to train them in Carnatik music and form their own band. During this journey, our friends from other colleges came to know about this and wanted to join and hence slowly the number of interested students increased and presently we have a team of 20 members.
We have completed projects like building a software containing details of interested blood donors with their blood group and contact details given in various hospitals for easy accessibility. We have conducted rural camps in rural areas and educated them regarding home remedies on various diseases in 6 villages reaching 2000+ villagers. We also conducted orientation in various colleges around Udupi to bring out the leadership qualities among students.

I succeeded in all these projects because of great co-ordination and support from my team. I could never visualize doing all these activities with my busy schedule earlier. But after returning from PRAYANA even with all the projects, managed time and am satisfied with my work. I conclude by saying “If I can do all this, why not others? If each one of us contributes as much as possible, we can make a better India for sure”
  


LEADer Amogh invented a Pedal powered Metal Cutter

Amogh Desia, a first semester mechanical engineering student at AITM College, Belgaum, is one of the few engineers who dedicated his knowledge and time towards improving lives of the people through low cost technology. Laborers everywhere are unable to afford expensive mechanical metal cutters, and are generally left with no choice other than the laborious act of cutting metal by hand. Amogh felt the hard work and effort of the metal cutters so he planned to ease their pain. With some struggle and confidence in the existence of a simple and more affordable solution, Amogh invented a pedal powered metal cutter which has the potential to help the laborers everywhere.

Amogh’s metal cutter relies on the simple principle of the conversion from rotation motion to oscillatory motion.  The machine itself is inexpensive, as it is made from the waste body of a bicycle and other pieces of scrap metal that are easy to find.  The machine is made from lightweight materials, it can be transported anywhere. The machine is also inexpensive to operate; it runs on a 12 volt power battery, which is then recharged by a dynamo that produces a current from paddling.  Amogh has even mounted a light to the machine so that it can be used at night.  Machine with multiple features only costs about Rs. 3000/-

Very few engineering first year students have created something so innovative and helpful, from a bicycle and a scrap metal.  While the impact of Amogh’s machine is yet to be determined, it is estimated to be of immense potential. Innovation is impressive, but only innovation that is inclusive of everyone can be transformational.  Though merely a first year student, Amogh has studied the important development and entrepreneurial lesson, and his future endeavors will likely be promising.